AUTHOR
EDITORIAL
TEAM
Jul
3
2019
AUTHOR
EDITORIAL
TEAM
Jul
3
2019
Technology

Tech Companies are Resorting to Photoshop Rather Than Actual Diversity

Tech Companies are Resorting to Photoshop Rather Than Actual Diversity

The tech industry has changed the way we work and live and has also delivered some of the most ground-breaking technologies, however, it has severely failed in the realm of diversity and inclusion. Some organizations have even resorted to photoshopping women onto a Silicon Valley executives group photo.

"Photoshop the change you want to see in the world"

Buzzfeed first made the discovery revealed that the two women CEOs, Lynn Jurich, and Ruzwana Bashir were actually photoshopped in the picture that captured 15 other male executives. It was quite obvious that the photo was doctored because the women appeared pixelated and badly lit as compared to the men. One spokesperson defended this action by saying, "When we realized we didn't have a shot where all attendees were represented, we added in photos of two female CEOs taken during the weekend. The photos were shared and approved with all the participants including the two women, Lynn Jurich, and Ruzwana Bashir, before posting them on Instagram and they also shared the group photo on their own Instagram handles. We meant no harm or had any malicious intent in doing this and we are sorry." Torn apart by social media, users went on to say, "Photoshop the change you want to see in the world."

There were no men who were photoshopped in

While it is true that the women agreed to be photoshopped into the picture, why weren't any men photoshopped too? Do women have to photoshopped in order to a part of tech events? Controversial or coincidence, it is safe to say that that the industry has a big diversity and inclusion problem and we're not just talking about women here. The share of Black and Latin American tech leaders is only 5 percent across the board. Facebook's diversity reports showed that their Black and Latin American employees have remained the same since 2014. Deborah Singer, chief marketing officer at Girls Who Code, said, "No wonder activists are skeptical about real progress in Silicon Valley. This is a culture problem that’s keeping women out of tech — it’s sexism, racism, harassment, discrimination, bias. And this Photoshop story is the perfect illustration."

Image credit: Buzzfeed

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