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EDITORIAL
TEAM
Jul
3
2019
AUTHOR
EDITORIAL
TEAM
Jul
3
2019
News

Japanese Medical School Sees Women Beat Men After Fair Scoring

Japanese Medical School Sees Women Beat Men After Fair Scoring

Remember when some medical schools in Japan rigged the score of its female students to give male students an unfair advantage over them. Well, after abolishing this unjust treatment of their female candidates Juntendo University in Tokyo reported an 8.28 percent pass rate while for men the pass rate was at 7.72 percent.

The University continued to defend their malpractice

This was the first time in 7 years that the University reported that women scored better than men. However, this result is only due to the fact that the University was outed by the media last year and despite the controversy, the dean of the medical school, Hiroyuki Daida defended their actions by saying, "Women mature faster mentally than men, and their communication ability is also higher. In some ways, this was a measure designed to help male applicants," he told the Japanese media. One of the reasons why some medical schools rigged scores to favor men was because they expressed concerns that women would leave the medical field when they got married and had children. Previously, the success rate for women was at a measly 2.9 for women as compared to 9 percent for men. After Juntendo University corrected the rigging for the fiscal year of 2019, it proved that women too belong in the medical as much as men.

They should create an environment where women can keep working

In 2018, 13 women sued the University for damages when the scandal came to light, they suffered extreme emotional stress due to gender-based discrimination. Arata Yamazaki, an attorney for the plaintiffs said last year, "Acceptance rates for female candidates were systematically lowered by Juntendo University. This is clearly discriminatory and should be strongly condemned." Yoshiko Maeda, the head of the Japan Medical Women’s Association, said, "Instead of worrying about women quitting jobs, they should do more to create an environment where women can keep working. And we need working-style reform, which is not just to prevent overwork deaths but to create a workplace where everyone can perform to the best of their ability regardless of gender."

Image credit: Juntendo University

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