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Jul
16
2019
AUTHOR
EDITORIAL
TEAM
Jul
16
2019
Workplace

Latest Survey Finds That Many Men Think That the Wage Gap is a Lie

Latest Survey Finds That Many Men Think That the Wage Gap is a Lie

Fake news! That's what this whole gender pay gap hoopla is. At least that's what 56 percent of men think and that this problem "is made up to serve a political purpose" rather than being a "legitimate issue." Like many issues of our time, like climate change, for example, many people do believe that the pay gap is "made up", revealed a SurveyMonkey poll. So, is the status quo defending the status quo to the bitter end?

Are women are making less because of their choices?

Of course, yes. "The status quo is very good at defending the status quo. That means there are powerful megaphones being used to say ‘Nothing to see here, everything is fine. If women are making less, it’s really because of their choices," said Emily Martin from the National Women’s Law Center in the US. While education and work experience may have an impact on the wages of male and female employees, there is a percentage of the wage gap that simply has no explanation and much of these can be attributed to the fact that people do face gender-based discrimination and we're not simply talking about women here. Also, "The fact that women are over-represented in low-wage jobs is itself a phenomenon that exists and is influenced by discrimination," added Martin. Research has shown that when men enter female-dominated fields like nursing, for example, they are paid more and that when a large number of women join a particular professional domain, wages go down.

Are some people blissfully unaware of the reality?

Unsurprisingly, there is also a huge difference in the reasons why men and women think that the gender wage gap exists; men think that women work fewer hours and work a career that doesn't pay enough, while women, on the other hand, said that unconscious bias and sexism were big factors. Also, while 71 percent of women thought the pay gap was very unfair, only 48 percent of men thought the same thing. Jillesa Gebhardt, a SurveyMonkey research scientist said, "It’s clear that there isn’t yet a solution that Americans are willing to rally behind. And it may be very challenging to develop one that the majority will support." Some of the reasons for this could be that some people are just blissfully unaware or are aware but still at bliss and simply not willing to do anything about it. Hired CEO Mehul Patel perfectly said, "If you’re not living it,” he says, “maybe you’re blissfully unaware." Is she very wrong?

Image credit: NPR

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