AUTHOR
EDITORIAL
TEAM
Jul
20
2019
AUTHOR
EDITORIAL
TEAM
Jul
20
2019
Technology

Technology Created by Indian Women is Changing the World

Technology Created by Indian Women is Changing the World

25-year-old Pune girl Sai Gole knew the hardships of farmers in India and coming from the state of Maharashtra which reported the highest rate of farmer suicides in the country, she knew she had to do something about it. In 2017, she won Google's Women Entrepreneur Quest (WEQ), she, however, isn't the only bringing technology that is transforming the country and the world.

From organic diapers to supporting women farmers

Meanwhile, Karnataka-based architect Priya Tolanavar found that after giving birth to her son, she was burdened with non-biodegradable waste every time her little one peed and pooped. She determined to find an eco-conscious solution to this, however, she couldn't find any on the market that was good enough. The next step was to start her own variant; Innate is a unique, eco-friendly cloth diaper that is not only gentle on the delicate skin of babies but also helps cut down on non-biodegradable waste. With the desire to become part of the solution rather than part of the problem, she made a prototype and share it with her family and friends; she eventually patented it. Similarly, Sai Gole to couldn't continue on with her life, she said, "The idea was to increase earnings or those in the unorganized sector with the use of technology. With this algorithm, we tried to decrease the cost of production to farmers. While most farmers have a hard time, women farmers are even lower in the rung. This kind of technology can specifically help them who cannot afford consultations."

Teaching refugees how to code

In addition to this, Mariam Fatima who with a degree in education found that her life changed after moving to Bangalore, the Silicon Valley of India. Inspired by the tech boom in the city, she started Udacity, a platform that offers user courses in technical fields like coding and designing websites. With a heart for teaching, she even moved to Zurich to teach refugees how to code so they can find themselves alternate jobs in a new country, saying "I teach students from Syria, Palestine. we are expanding to teaching regular students too now, but the courses for the refugee students are free." Hence, many women in India are not giving up if they cannot find an answer to something and some are changing the various gaps across the industries in the countries into successful businesses.

Image credit: AnitaB.org

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