AUTHOR
AMANDA
FRANCIS
Aug
6
2019
AUTHOR
AMANDA
FRANCIS
Aug
6
2019
Insights

Online Menstrual Products A Hit With Small-town Indian Women

Online Menstrual Products A Hit With Small-town Indian Women

You've probably experienced it a few times, but only some women have gotten used to the awkwardness when it comes to buying menstrual health and hygiene products from local pharmacies. Whether it's uncomfortable looks from store owners and their obsession with covering sanitary pads with newspaper or black plastic bags, there are also many women who are embarrassed to buy these items thanks to small-town culture. However, with online shopping stores opening its doors to there areas, women living in the small-towns of India are in love with the anonymity of it all.

Women are also experimenting with alternative menstrual products

Women no longer need to feel uncomfortable especially when menstrual hygiene products are being delivered to their doorstep without having to be judged by those who are selling them. From tampons to menstrual cups, more Indian women are experimenting with alternative products, along with intimate washes and urination devices. Even though sanitary napkins are dominating the market, it is great news that women are curious to know what is out there with regards to new products. Nishit Garg, Flipkart head of books, general merchandise, and home, said, "Online selling platforms provide customers a wide range of products, offers, and discretion in delivery, encouraging women to experiment with purchase choices." Flipkart also revealed that Indian cities like Kolkata, New Delhi, Bengaluru, Ghaziabad, Patna, Pune, Amritsar, Ambala (Haryana), Mumbai, Burdwan (West Bengal). Also, the company saw a five-fold growth in the feminine hygiene category in tier two and three cities.

Brands like Carmesi, Nua, Heyday, etc are tapping into millennials

"Nearly 100 million of India’s 300-400 million-strong middle class currently live in tier 2 and tier 3 cities. Many women in these places lack access to brick-and-mortar stores where they can purchase hygiene products. So, now they are turning to online channels," added Garg. In 2017, sales of feminine hygiene products were at $340 million and are now expected to grow $522 million by 2020, according to market research firm Euromonitor. Furthermore, the advent of alternative brands like Carmesi, Nua, Heyday, Azah, and Visionaari are tapping into the millennial demographic since women are also now more aware of the environment and are choosing eco-conscious options. Indian women are also becoming more aware of menstrual issues like PCOS and endometriosis and are accordingly choosing products to meet their needs. Local stores usually do not stock specialty products and here's where shopping websites swoop in to save the day. 

Image credit: Quartz

AUTHOR
AMANDA FRANCIS

Be a guest author