AUTHOR
EDITORIAL
TEAM
Aug
10
2019
AUTHOR
EDITORIAL
TEAM
Aug
10
2019
Bookshelf

Caroline Criado Perez Focuses on Gender Data Bias in 'Invisible Women'

Caroline Criado Perez Focuses on Gender Data Bias in 'Invisible Women'

Everyone knows about the various gender imbalances that exist in our world today, however, they become more real than ever, particularly when they are quantified through numbers and percentages. Author Caroline Criado Perez gives readers a lot to chew on in her book 'Invisible Women,' where her research is both shocking and sobering, giving an insight about how women really live in the world, not just in the developed world.

Criado Perez asks people to 'think again, to collect more data

Whether it's only 1 in 3 women who have access to safe toilets or that 53 percent of women at work are more stressed than their male counterparts, or that it was only 2011 when car manufacturers decided to use female dummies in crash tests. Hence, the invisibility of women has taken many forms for generations, like when you rejoiced that time when you saw a brown woman in a Hollywood movie because you knew that mainstream culture did not include South Asian looking women; all too familiar for people from other minorities. From race to disability to living in a world designed to benefit men, Criado Perez asks people to 'think again, to collect more data, study that data, and ask women what they want. It’s that simple.' She also asks tough questions on women and men living in the same society, 'Should we make workplaces with built-in creches to help women back to work, or should we demand that fathers take on an equal share of childcare responsibilities and make childcare everyone’s problem?' 

No one meant to deliberately exclude women, they were just forgotten

Criado Perez is also a social activist and journalist who is best known for campaigning that famed author Jane Austen be featured on a British pound note. She first came across the gender data gap in 2014 while research medicine and was shocked something like this could exist in the 21st century. She writes in her book, "No one meant to deliberately exclude women. It’s just what may seem objective is actually highly male-biased." Hence, a lot of male designs have simply forgotten to factor in women because there wasn't a woman on the team, it is accidental because they just didn't think of it, like pregnancy parking, or baby changing rooms in airports, for example. 'Invisible Women' shows men that they must see the world as it is which is full of injustices and it shows women injustices can actually be quantified into numbers and it not a figment of the female imagination.

Image credit: Feminist Current

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